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Get Ready to Roast, Beaver Nation!

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Kickoff and television has been set for Oregon State's next game, Saturday, Oct. 10 in Tucson against Arizona. Given that both the 'Cats and the Beavers were the victims of multi-touchdown blowout losses at home, albeit to higher ranked opponents, this past weekend, its a surprise that the game wasn't relegated to the Pac-12 Channel, but Fox Sports 1 still selected the game.

The bad news is they slotted it in a 1 PM AST & PDT television slot.

Ordinarily, getting a rare afternoon game start would be something Oregon State and their fans would do ANYTHING to secure, but the one time a night start actually makes sense, the game won't be Pac-12 after dark material.

If the Beavers are lucky, temperatures will be in the 90s in Tucson at kickoff, but could be over 100 degrees. In any event, the temperature will continue to climb throughout the game. And as can be seen from the lead photo, there's essentially no shade. The reason, of course, is no reasonable person schedules games at Arizona or Arizona State for any time other than after dark until at least November 1st.

This scheduling decision was obviously made by someone who, if they are even on scene, will be in an air conditioned suite, not outdoors, during the game.

There is some good news; when Arizona redid their field, putting in an artificial surface to replace the hideously dangerous turf that contributed to James Rodgers' hideous knee injury the last time the Beavers were in Tucson, they put in what is called "Cool turf", which is a regular, modern artificial turf, but with a system of pipes underneath that circulate cold water under the surface.

Artificial turf surface temperatures, between their reflective nature and the heat storing nature of the ground up rubber, are typically at least 30 degrees warmer than the ambient temperature on sunny days, and the surface temperature can be as much as 50 degrees higher. Without the cooling system, the game would be played in at least 140 degree heat. As it is, it will still be well over 100, but its possible at least that the field will not be an immediate threat to life and health, just a cumulative one. Depth will decide the game, not talent.

Andy_Wooldridge@yahoo.com